On top of fines, traffic tickets can have an adverse effect on your life in another form: license points. The state stacks these on driving records as well to determine when to consider suspension or outright revocation for your driving privileges. 

Many traffic violations carry a certain point value that, according to Illinois Administrative Code’s offense table, range from five to 55 points. 

Offenses and points

The design structure of these points discourages serious violations while providing opportunities to appeal over less impactful infractions. Tickets for speeding above the limit by 1-5 mph or obstructing street car traffic merits only five points. Though they stay on your record, they do not cost enough to merit a suspension. Severe violations like speeding 25+ over the speed limit or failing to stop and give insurance information or give aid after a collision merits 50 points — an infraction that puts your license into question out the gate. 

Some offenses listed do not come with points, though that does not necessarily mean they do not permanently mark your record. Some elicit suspension or revocation without adding points. 

Removing points

The offense table states no definite way of removing your points, which means one of the best ways to keep points off your record may be to avoid them in the first place. When you receive a ticket, there are ways to appeal and defend against them. If the ticket doesn’t go through, neither do the points. If a ticket sticks, you may want to contact your local DMV to inquire about safe driving or point appeals to determine your next course of action.